Posts categorized as Food

Coping, Cleaning and Cooking During Quarantine

  Wow, what a difference a week can make. One day I’m writing about a beautiful pigeon in the Key Food parking lot, the next I’m frantically refreshing Katie Honan’s* twitter feed, stockpiling garlic and Sclafani tomatoes and using Lysol with bleach as Amazon packages arriving at my door. New York state is on “PAUSE”. A very necessary measure by our government, trying to play catch-up to flatten the curve of the Covid-19 pandemic. The hope is to alleviate some of the burden on our medical system, first responders and […]

Pretzel Flashback

I was flipping through a magazine and came across a recipe for homemade jumbo soft pretzels. It struck a chord. I remember as a kid going into Manhattan to see the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree with my family. My sisters and I would beg my dad to stop and get us pretzels from the corner cart. It was December and cold outside. The steam rising from the twirling pretzels inside the glass case was all I could focus on. It reminded me of the animated Christmas displays – the ones […]

tagged in comfort foods, recipe

strawberries dessert recipes

Here are some strawberry dessert recipes that look worthy. Check out my post here, where I tried the Easy Strawberry Tart recipe. Recipes from savoryonline.com.com 

Vegetarian Lentil Soup

Sitting down to a hot bowl of soup in the winter is a delicious treat

Fresh spinach adds even more nutrition to this recipe. We are in the thick of winter now and the soup is on. I’ve always enjoyed a steaming bowl of lentils, even before legumes became so trendy. To some these seeds are a new superfood but lentils are crazy old!  I’m talking caveman old. The lentil plant has been around for five million years. Once domesticated, this crop became known as  “the poor man’s food”, because they were cheap to harvest and available worldwide. Today a 16 oz bag is only […]

tagged in recipe

Church, Chick Peas and the Holy Johnny Cash

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My plan for this week was to write about a tasty, healthy chickpea salad recipe, but two notable experiences happened last Sunday at St. Francis De Sales (129-16 Rockaway Beach Blvd, Belle Harbor) as my church-hopping journey continues. So here’s both! I almost didn’t make it to Saint Francis last week. I got the time wrong. I had the thought,  “Well, I tried.” but I did end up back in the car 45 minutes later. And I’m glad I did because I was reminded by a flyer in the back […]

tagged in church, happy hour, recipe

Paula’s Pea Soup With Crispy Fried Onions

The begin of split pea soup

Everyone is talking turkey but I’m talking soup. I’ve been cooking a different soup each Sunday – escarole soup, vegetable soup, french onion soup, lentil soup – Italian style and an Indian curry version. This past week I made split pea soup for the first time. I’m not a big pea person but I wanted to give it a try anyway, to experiment. Because storage of dried peas is easy and low-cost, many cultures have pea-based soup recipes. The traditional split pea variety originates in the 19th century. Sailors would […]

tagged in recipe, recipes, winter

The Basics On Planting Garlic

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Basil and tomatoes are a staple in home gardens, especially those kept by Italians. But garlic, a base for so many meals across so many cultures is grown significantly less. Why? I’m assuming it’s because garlic is a cool-weather crop and you can’t buy a starter plant at the garden center. Moreover, many people assume the garden season ends when September hits. NYC is garden Zone 7 which means we can grow food and plant for the spring until the first frost. These days, that feels like mid-December. Kale, collards, […]

tagged in fall, gardening

Learning, One Bite At A Time

Edible Rockweed can be found right here on the peninsula!

As I mentioned last week, I want to elaborate on a few more edible plants I discovered at Fort Tilden while on a walking tour with naturalist, and Northern Eastern forager expert Wildman Steve Brill.* Barbarea (Wintercress or Yellow Rocket).  We stumbled upon a low growing plant in a rosette formation. Brill directed us to tear a leaf and he asked what flavor it reminds us of. I thought it tasted spicy. Someone blurted out, mustard. “Correct!” Brill said with excitement, “This native edible is an Herbaceous plant (herb or […]

tagged in forage

The Wildman

Wildman Steve Brill ready to sample the bitter Winged Sumac. Make pink lemonade with this plant!

His appearance is what you’d expect: utilitarian. The Wildman is wearing a long-sleeved blue windbreaker and khaki pants with multiple pockets. A strap holds a shovel and an iPad. A safari hat shades his face. His fingernails have already been in the soil.  “Take a quick look at my books and then we’ll get started,” he says. Several cooking and foraging books are laid out on the front window of his dusty car. As the parents get their kids’ jackets zipped and the snacks packed up, the Wildman breaks out […]

tagged in forage

Red Hot Chili Peppers

My column this week isn’t about the 90s funk-rock band out of L.A., rather I’m discussing the spicy, hot fruits that I grew in my garden this year. It started this spring. I must have picked up a cayenne pepper plant by mistake or maybe it was mislabeled, who knows. I didn’t realize I had chili peppers growing in my garden until a few  weeks ago when they began turning red. All along I thought they were stunted shintos! I found cayenne very easy to grow, unlike bell peppers* which […]